Protecting Water

Feature

Because lakes and rivers are fish habitat, they are protected by the Fisheries Act. This Act is Canada’s oldest environmental legislation and prohibits the release of “deleterious substances” into fish-bearing waters and the alteration or destruction of fish habitat. However, in 2002, Schedule 2 was added to the Metal Mining Effluent Regulation (Schedule 1 lists the regulation's "Authorized Officers"). Schedule 2 essentially allows for re-classifying any natural water body that gets listed on it as a “tailings impoundment area.” Once a lake or river gets listed, it is no longer considered a natural water body and no longer protected by the Fisheries Act. A mining company can use then it as a dumping ground for millions of tonnes of tailings and waste rock.

Latest News

Monday, December 22, 2014

News release: The Colombian government agency defined the boundaries of 76% of the páramo - high altitude wetlands - in Santurbán, in the department of Santander. However, the ministry further announced that mining projects with titles and environmental licences could continue, putting the ecosystem in grave risk, given that it is a source of water for roughly 2 million people.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Neskonlith Secwepemc First Nation has issued an eviction notice to Imperial Metals - the company whose Mount Polley mine released 14.5 billion litres of solid and liquid wastes into the Quesnel Lake watershed on August 4.

Monday, June 2, 2014

RWB LogoOnlyNewBoomerangNews release: On April 28, 2014, the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) notified investors on its Refilings and Errors List that Chieftain Metals Corp. was non-compliant in its mineral project disclosure. On the same day, Chieftain Metals issued a corrected Annual Information Form noting that the report had been revised “in connection with a continuous disclosure review by the Ontario Securities Commission.”