Reforming Mining Laws and Policies

Features

Across Canada, communities and Aboriginal governments are saying they have had enough when it comes to the privileged access mining has to land under the existing system, which grants “free entry” to prospectors and mining companies under the assumption the mining is the “highest and best” use of land. Globally, communities are demanding a say in their own futures, and Indigenous peoples in particular are increasingly demanding free, prior, informed consent for development projects that will affect them.

Latest News

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Halifax – As Canada’s annual Energy & Mines Ministers Conference winds up in Halifax, MiningWatch Canada is pleased that Canada’s Mines Ministers have discussed mine waste management issues following last year’s massive Mount Polley spill in British Columbia. But the mining watch dog is also concerned that the meeting will not result with any concrete commitments in in order to prevent future mine waste disasters.

Monday, July 20, 2015

(UPDATED with additional signatories July 13, 2015)(Halifax) While Energy & Mines Ministers from across Canada are meeting in Halifax for their annual conference, a coalition of more than 50 environmental, First Nations, and community organizations today sent a letter to all Canadian Mines Ministers urging them to take immediate action to assess and prevent the threat posed by hundreds of mine waste dams and impoundments in Canada.

Friday, July 17, 2015

(Quebec) The Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine welcomes the conclusions of the Quebec Environmental & Public Hearings Panel (BAPE), which concluded that the risks and uncertainties of the mining of uranium relating to health and the environment are still too numerous to allow it to proceed.