Feature

We’re Celebrating Fifteen Years of Action in Support of Communities Affected by Mining

15th Anniversary Solidarity Share

In honour of MiningWatch Canada's fifteenth anniversary, we are selling "Solidarity Shares" at $15 each. Unlike corporate mining shares, these Solidarity Shares go to support social justice and solidarity with and between mining-affected communities. Buy as many as you want, for yourself or for your friends! Click on the "Donate Today" button above on the right.

For a very selective summary of our proudest achievements of the past fifteen years, check out this flyer.

Barrick Gold Makes Remedy Victims of Violence and Rape in Papua New Guinea and Tanzania Conditional on Legal Immunity

Since January, 2013, MiningWatch Canada has raised concern about the fact that Barrick Gold is seeking legal immunity from victims of rape by mine security guards at the company’s Porgera Joint Venture Mine in Papua New Guinea (PNG). If these survivors accept an individual "remedy" package they must sign a waiver that assures Barrick that they will never sue the company in PNG or anywhere else in the world.

We have engaged the United Nations High Commissioner of Human Rights (UNHCHR) on this issue. In December 2013 we discovered a...

Latest News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Last week the Minister of the Environment, Leona Aglukkaq bent to the desire of BC to go it alone on the environmental assessment of another major resource development project – in this case, the proposed Ruddock Creek Lead and Zinc Mine.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Late last week the Supreme Court of Canada released another important Aboriginal rights decision regarding the Grassy Narrows case. Like the Tsilhqot'in decision a few weeks back the Grassy case was prompted by the threats and impacts of extensive commercial logging on traditional indigenous territories. Grassy Narrows was joined in the action by Wabauskang First Nation which has experienced logging as well as extensive mining developments in their traditional territory.

Monday, July 14, 2014

There was no doubt that the Canada-Honduras Free Trade Agreement would be rushed through the Senate and receive Royal Assent before parliament recessed in June. Five years ago, however, – before then-Honduran President Mel Zelaya’s back door was shot open and he was flown to Costa Rica in his pyjamas in a military-backed coup – such a trade pact was not so sure.