Feature

Barrick Gold Makes Remedy Victims of Violence and Rape in Papua New Guinea and Tanzania Conditional on Legal Immunity

Since January, 2013, MiningWatch Canada has raised concern about the fact that Barrick Gold is seeking legal immunity from victims of rape by mine security guards at the company’s Porgera Joint Venture Mine in Papua New Guinea (PNG). If these survivors accept an individual "remedy" package they must sign a waiver that assures Barrick that they will never sue the company in PNG or anywhere else in the world.

We have engaged the United Nations High Commissioner of Human Rights (UNHCHR) on this issue. In December 2013 we discovered a similar program for victims of rape and violence at African Barrick Gold’s North Mara Mine in Tanzania. We call on Barrick to provide greater transparency on the North Mara program for victims of the mines security guards and police.

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Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Media Advisory: In anticipation of an imminent ruling from a little-known arbitration tribunal at the World Bank that could force El Salvador to pay Canadian-Australian mining firm OceanaGold US$301 million, a Salvadoran delegation will visit Canada next week to discuss how investor-state arbitration threatens democratic decision-making, public health and the environment here and beyond our borders.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

News release: Mining Watch Romania in association with 22 Romanian and international NGOs presents Anticipating Surprise-Assessing Risk: An investors' guide to Eldorado Gold's Certej mine proposal ahead of the company's 2015 Annual General Meeting today in Vancouver. The report exposes a compendium of risks associated with the Certej gold project and highlights some less evident or known facts that in return are likely to impair Eldorado's ability to develop it.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Today a large and diverse group of Canadians and Americans called on the British Columbia government to halt the permitting of wet tailings facilities for new and proposed mines in B.C. based on the Independent Expert Panel recommendations on the Mount Polley mine tailings disaster. Eighty-seven Alaska Native tribes, members of B.C. First Nations, businesses, prominent individuals, scientists, and conservation groups signed a letter to the B.C. government calling for a shift to newer and safer dry tailings storage technology.