Ontario

Friday, August 12, 2005

Attawapiskat First Nation Member Mike Koostachin submitted the following statement to the Federal Regulators on January 21, 2004. It concerns the impact of a possible diamond mine in the James Bay lowlands.

Wachay!

Friday, August 12, 2005

A number of key issues are delaying a decision on the Environmental Assessment of DeBeers' proposed Victor Diamond Mine in Attawapiskat in northern Ontario.

Friday, August 12, 2005

The Ontario Mining Action Network (OMAN) was launched in Sudbury, Ontario on December 5, 2004 at the conclusion of a two-day workshop on mining in Ontario. Representatives from First Nation communities, labour organizations, environmental groups and mining-affected communities from Southern and Northern Ontario identified a number of obstacles to more responsible and better regulated mining in the province and agreed to use the strength of a network to address these issues in their communities and at the government/policy level.

Tuesday, July 5, 2005

The Victor project should be delayed until Attawapiskat First Nation and the communities in the Mushkekowuk Council region have created the capacity, land use planning and education to benefit from the profits from the mine over generations. Regulatory Authorities (RAs) and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency have a responsibility to find that there are "significant environmental effects"?

Thursday, June 23, 2005

The Victor Diamond Project is located in Northern Ontario, approximately 90 km west of the coastal community of Attawapiskat. This project involves Attawapiskat First Nation, and three other remote communities on the shores of James Bay: Moose Cree, Fort Albany, and Kashechewan First Nations. It also includes three road accessible communities: Taykwa Tagamou, Chapleau Cree and Missanabie Cree First Nations.

The diamond mine will be an open pit mine with an expected life of 12 years.

Thursday, June 23, 2005
Ontario's Ministry of Northern Development and Mines announced in 1999 a $27 million commitment to an abandoned mines rehabilitation program, with an emphasis on "eliminating risks to public safety" through the capping of abandoned mine shafts, removal of mine structures, and backfilling pits and trenches. To date, approximately $5 million has been spent on remediation of physical hazards, and ...
Thursday, June 23, 2005

In Ontario, a regulation made under Bill 26 (the Savings and Restructuring Act introduced in January 1996) enabled profound changes to the Public Lands Act. 

Monday, February 28, 2005

The Ontario Mining Action Network (OMAN) was launched in Sudbury, Ontario on December 5, 2004, at the conclusion of a two-day workshop on mining in Ontario. Representatives from First Nation communities, labour organizations, environmental groups and mining-affected communities from Southern and Northern Ontario identified a number of obstacles to more responsible and better regulated mining in the province and agreed to use the strength of a network to address these issues in their communities and at the government/policy level.

Thursday, October 28, 2004

October 28, 2004

Lise-Aurore Lapalme
Natural Resources Canada
580 Booth Street, 10th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 0E4

Paul Schafer
Senior Program Officer, Ontario Region
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
907-55 St. Clair Avenue East
Toronto, ON M4T 1M2

Re: Comprehensive Study Report, Victor Project, FEAI number 40568

I am writing to provide the comments of MiningWatch Canada on the Environmental Assessment of the Victor Diamond Project at Attawapiskat.

Saturday, August 7, 2004

The presentation builds on the idea that the mining industry is propped up by seven myths:
- Mining is about the extraction of minerals
- Mining has a small footprint
- Communities are eager to have mining
- Government will protect us, and there are laws and regulations in place to do this
- The economic benefits from mining justify the disruption
- We need more raw materials
- Mining is okay somewhere else but not here

Available here as a PDF.